Glen O'Neill

I am a father, husband, comic artist, t-shirt and print designer, gamer and an all around easy-going dude.
I co-founded and co-own The Yetee.
I also love 1960's Samurai Flicks, Godzilla and Star Wars.
Email me at gleno@theyetee.com to get in touch.
theyetee:

Loving Father, Caring Husband, Secret Octopus.
We’re excited to announce that Octodad has joined the Yeteemart in a special collection of exclusive designs! The store is launching with two shirts by Yetee artists! Buy both this weekend and you will save $4!Hail Octodad by Gordon Brebner*whispers*…..hail octodad…
Octodad Retro by Drew WiseA classic edition of an amazing game!
Zoom
Info
theyetee:

Loving Father, Caring Husband, Secret Octopus.
We’re excited to announce that Octodad has joined the Yeteemart in a special collection of exclusive designs! The store is launching with two shirts by Yetee artists! Buy both this weekend and you will save $4!Hail Octodad by Gordon Brebner*whispers*…..hail octodad…
Octodad Retro by Drew WiseA classic edition of an amazing game!
Zoom
Info
theyetee:

Loving Father, Caring Husband, Secret Octopus.
We’re excited to announce that Octodad has joined the Yeteemart in a special collection of exclusive designs! The store is launching with two shirts by Yetee artists! Buy both this weekend and you will save $4!Hail Octodad by Gordon Brebner*whispers*…..hail octodad…
Octodad Retro by Drew WiseA classic edition of an amazing game!
Zoom
Info
theyetee:

Loving Father, Caring Husband, Secret Octopus.
We’re excited to announce that Octodad has joined the Yeteemart in a special collection of exclusive designs! The store is launching with two shirts by Yetee artists! Buy both this weekend and you will save $4!Hail Octodad by Gordon Brebner*whispers*…..hail octodad…
Octodad Retro by Drew WiseA classic edition of an amazing game!
Zoom
Info
theyetee:

Loving Father, Caring Husband, Secret Octopus.
We’re excited to announce that Octodad has joined the Yeteemart in a special collection of exclusive designs! The store is launching with two shirts by Yetee artists! Buy both this weekend and you will save $4!Hail Octodad by Gordon Brebner*whispers*…..hail octodad…
Octodad Retro by Drew WiseA classic edition of an amazing game!
Zoom
Info

theyetee:

Loving Father, Caring Husband, Secret Octopus.

We’re excited to announce that Octodad has joined the Yeteemart in a special collection of exclusive designs! The store is launching with two shirts by Yetee artists! Buy both this weekend and you will save $4!

Hail Octodad
 by Gordon Brebner
*whispers*…..hail octodad…

Octodad Retro by Drew Wise
A classic edition of an amazing game!

bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info
bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info
bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info
bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info
bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info
bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info
bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info
bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info
bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info
bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:


The Innovations of Fleischer Studios   
Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.
In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.
The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 
Zoom
Info

bombsfall:

tenaflyviper:

The Innovations of Fleischer Studios  

Besides changing the face of animation by bringing the world the invention of the Rotoscope, as well as the concept and animation technique of "Follow the Bouncing Ball" sing-alongs, Max Fleischer and his studio also pioneered a revolutionary technique in animation, known as the “Stereoptical Process”.

In this process, a circular, 3-D model of a background - a diorama - is built to the scale of the animation cells.  It allowed for a spectacular sense of depth and dimension, long before Ub Iwerks came up with the Multiplane.   Within the model setup, the animation cells could be placed at varying levels from the scenery, and even between objects, so that foreground elements could pass in front of them, adding to the dimensional effect.  It was an effective method for panning and tracking shots, which would require a turn of the table with each photographed cell of animation.

The process was used in many of the studio’s cartoons, particularly in their longer, “two-reel” shorts, such as Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936), Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba’s Forty Thieves (1937), and Betty Boop in Poor Cinderella (1934) - the only color (albeit in two-strip Cinecolor), theatrical cartoon ever made starring the iconic animated songstress, which features her as a redhead!

So interesting :D

Possibly my favorite thing to happen during that period of animation.

Oh man, I always wondered how they did that Sindbad/Popeye stuff… even as I was a kid! 

(via wilwheaton)

sirmitchell:

My friend Judy Schmidt processes Hubble Telescope data for fun and these are some of her results. How she does it is way over my head, but I’m very appreciative of the time she takes to make each one of them. I love how she’s able to show that the universe is overrun with mind boggling scenery, and what we’re accustomed to seeing isn’t all our galaxy has to offer.  When you’re done looking at these, I highly recommend checking out her flickr, which has more images, and information to go along with it. 
Zoom
Info
sirmitchell:

My friend Judy Schmidt processes Hubble Telescope data for fun and these are some of her results. How she does it is way over my head, but I’m very appreciative of the time she takes to make each one of them. I love how she’s able to show that the universe is overrun with mind boggling scenery, and what we’re accustomed to seeing isn’t all our galaxy has to offer.  When you’re done looking at these, I highly recommend checking out her flickr, which has more images, and information to go along with it. 
Zoom
Info
sirmitchell:

My friend Judy Schmidt processes Hubble Telescope data for fun and these are some of her results. How she does it is way over my head, but I’m very appreciative of the time she takes to make each one of them. I love how she’s able to show that the universe is overrun with mind boggling scenery, and what we’re accustomed to seeing isn’t all our galaxy has to offer.  When you’re done looking at these, I highly recommend checking out her flickr, which has more images, and information to go along with it. 
Zoom
Info
sirmitchell:

My friend Judy Schmidt processes Hubble Telescope data for fun and these are some of her results. How she does it is way over my head, but I’m very appreciative of the time she takes to make each one of them. I love how she’s able to show that the universe is overrun with mind boggling scenery, and what we’re accustomed to seeing isn’t all our galaxy has to offer.  When you’re done looking at these, I highly recommend checking out her flickr, which has more images, and information to go along with it. 
Zoom
Info
sirmitchell:

My friend Judy Schmidt processes Hubble Telescope data for fun and these are some of her results. How she does it is way over my head, but I’m very appreciative of the time she takes to make each one of them. I love how she’s able to show that the universe is overrun with mind boggling scenery, and what we’re accustomed to seeing isn’t all our galaxy has to offer.  When you’re done looking at these, I highly recommend checking out her flickr, which has more images, and information to go along with it. 
Zoom
Info
sirmitchell:

My friend Judy Schmidt processes Hubble Telescope data for fun and these are some of her results. How she does it is way over my head, but I’m very appreciative of the time she takes to make each one of them. I love how she’s able to show that the universe is overrun with mind boggling scenery, and what we’re accustomed to seeing isn’t all our galaxy has to offer.  When you’re done looking at these, I highly recommend checking out her flickr, which has more images, and information to go along with it. 
Zoom
Info
sirmitchell:

My friend Judy Schmidt processes Hubble Telescope data for fun and these are some of her results. How she does it is way over my head, but I’m very appreciative of the time she takes to make each one of them. I love how she’s able to show that the universe is overrun with mind boggling scenery, and what we’re accustomed to seeing isn’t all our galaxy has to offer.  When you’re done looking at these, I highly recommend checking out her flickr, which has more images, and information to go along with it. 
Zoom
Info

sirmitchell:

My friend Judy Schmidt processes Hubble Telescope data for fun and these are some of her results. How she does it is way over my head, but I’m very appreciative of the time she takes to make each one of them. I love how she’s able to show that the universe is overrun with mind boggling scenery, and what we’re accustomed to seeing isn’t all our galaxy has to offer.  

When you’re done looking at these, I highly recommend checking out her flickr, which has more images, and information to go along with it. 

1 of 3
Load More Posts
Sorry, No More Posts
Loading...